Soy Sauce Fried Eggs, v2 and v3

Breakfast is not complete if it doesn’t have an egg, specifically fried.  I guess I got used to it because it was a staple when we were growing up.

Nowadays, hubby is served eggs for breakfast too.  On most days they’re plain fried eggs, or maybe scrambled eggs.  But once in a while, he gets a special treat… like today!

These fried eggs with soy sauce is a childhood favorite.  I had forgotten the original recipe and tried to re-create it a couple of years ago. My first attempt was not bad, but something was missing.

Sometime later I tried again, and it was better.  The resulting dish had more depth –

1 tablespoon light soya sauce
1/2 tablespoon mild vinegar
1/2 tablespoon mild honey
1 tablespoon water
dash of sesame oil

The procedure is uncomplicated — fry some eggs, sunny side up.  Place in serving platter (not a flat or shallow one but not a deep bowl).  Mix the sauce ingredients and heat slightly; pour over the eggs.  My variation here is that I added a “century egg”.

[side note:  I found the cookbook sometime after (which is as old as me – it was published the year I was born!) and  I was happy to discover that my recreation was pretty close.]

Hubby liked it, but when he heard there was honey, he asked if (next time) it was possible to skip it…

Fast forward to “next time”, i.e. now – I reformulated my sauce recipe (procedure is the same) …

1 tablespoon kecap manis (sweet soya sauce)
1/2 tablespoon sinamak (local spicy sap vinegar)
1 tablespoon water
dash of sesame oil
pinch of chili powder

Hubby prefers it this way.  I did explain that the soy sauce I used is a sweet one, but he was ok with it!




Creamy Anchovy Vinaigrette

Ever since I learned how easy it was to make vinaigrette, I’d been experimenting with all sorts of combinations.

The basic elements of a vinaigrette are (1) the sour, (2) the salty, (3) the oily [olive oil], and at times, (4) the sweet, and/or (5) the creamy [if preferred].  Add spices as desired (seasonings like herbs, or flavor profiles like bacon, etc.)

For this salad – mixed greens, sliced tomatoes, feta and double-cream cheese, I decided to use up the leftover anchovies in the fridge.

In a shaker, add 4 tablespoons of olive oil, 1 to 2 tablespoons calamansi juice, about a tablespoon of anchovies, mashed, a large pinch of sugar, and 2 tablespoons mayonnaise.  Shake, shake, shake then pour over the salad!


Bamboo Shoot-Salted Egg X.O.

Hubby and I were at the Chinese grocery store to buy soy sauce.  I chanced upon the lovely bamboo shoots that were displayed.  Not being able to resist, I picked up a 500g pack!

So what did we have for dinner???  Bamboo shoots!!!

My mother once told me that bamboo shoots should always be boiled is lightly salted water… even those that come from a can.  So that’s what I did – I boiled the bamboo shoots after slicing them into pieces.

My next problem was how to cook them.  Usually I stir-fry the shoots with some pork, shrimp. and mushrooms.  Except that I had not of those at the moment.  Upon searching the fridge, I discovered that I had… salted eggs!  And some spices, i.e. XO sauce and dried shallots.

So then I got out 2 pieces of salted eggs and removed the yolks.  The yolks were mashed, while the whites were cubed.

Heat some oil in a wok then put in the mashed yolks.  Cook the yolks until frothy, then add the whites.  Stir fry several seconds, then add a chopped up dried chili (I used dried Thai chili), about a tablespoon of dried shallots and a heaping teaspoon of XO sauce.  Mix around a bit then add the bamboo shoots.  Splash some water into the wok to prevent it from drying out.  Season with salt, to taste, if desired.  Cook a couple of minutes more.  Then it is done!

I was nervous at first that hubby would not like it, since it is an “invented” dish but he said it was very good!

(smile, smile)

Dark Chocolate Vanilla Liqueur

A couple of years ago, someone gave me Cacao Liqueur as a Christmas gift.  It was so delicious that I wanted to learn to make it.

Fast forward to the present and I think I have the liqueur that I adoringly love!  I’d been experimenting and, in fact, last Christmas, I made a batch and gave them away as gifts.  The liqueur was made with cocoa powder and they were delicious (as the recipients attest) but it was not (yet) perfect for me.

I wanted a rich, dark, deep chocolate-y flavor and a thick, creamy texture.

This time I think I got it after a few experiments.

My secret?  No cocoa, but bittersweet chocolate, thinned with milk!

(I re-used the nice decorative bottle of the Cacao Liqueur.)

Chocolate Hazelnut Liqueur

The first batch I made was technically what they call “Nutellino“, which is essentially Nutella liqueur.  It was fast and easy to make and the recepients (friend S and brother E) proclaimed the drink “super yummy”.

But I suppose I wanted a bit of a challenge, so I went on to look for a “from-scratch” recipe… and this is what i found.  It was not exactly what I had in mind – I was looking for something creamy… a consistency similar to Irish cream… so I started to experiment a little.

First I did away with using cocoa powder.  I melted bittersweet chocolate (62%) with milk and a bit of cream.  After cooling, I added toasted hazelnuts and vodka and steeped everything for a month, after which I strained the mixture and used a decorative bottle.

I loved the texture – it was creamy, sweet, nutty, chocolate-y!

The picture shows the third batch I made, which was intended for hubby’s friends.  The bottle is actually a plastic water bottle which hubby preferred to a decorative glass bottle, saying that after drinking the liqueur, the water bottle can be reused as a carry-on water bottle by his friends!



Lucille’s Apple Pie Spice

Where I live, there is no apple pie spice to be found in the supermarket, not even in specialty stores.  My mom used to ask relatives who lived abroad to buy for her, specifically the McCormick brand.

But in our corner of the world, there is NONE.  So what to do? What to do>  Make your own, of course!

The ingredient list in the McCormick spice bottle lists cinnamon, nutmeg and allspice.  Meanwhile, there are numerous recipes online for apple pie spice, all them are largely cinnamon-based, always with nutmeg and allspice and a couple other spices, one or two strange sounding spices that are, yep, likewise unavailable locally. Sigh.

Still going by the ingredient list in the McCormick spice bottle, someone suggested recreating it using 4 parts cinnamon, 2 parts nutmeg and 1 part allspice.  Not bad, I suppose.  In any case you can’t go wrong.

But, I decided on this version, which suits my desire for added “drama” while maintaining the essence of the spice blend.  Sadly, I cannot share the recipe. But it is one that I have been using for roughly 7 years now and everyone says it is very good!

Now, I shall attempt (once again) my mother’s recipe for Apple Pie!


Panettone, No Knead

Officially, at least in my country, Christmas is NOT over. Somehow, we start in September and go on until the first Sunday of January of the coming year! So the stores still have their Christmas decorations and displays, as well as their Christmas music blaring.

As for me, I did very little Christmas baking/cooking, if at all. I had asked hubby if he wanted fruitcake (he usually did) but lo and behold, he asked me to hold off on making fruitcake. Meanwhile I anticipated his saying yes and already bought some mixed dried fruit and mixed glazed fruit! I thought, oh well, I could always make something else later on and simply stuck the stuff in the fridge.

But as soon as Christmas day passed, I got an urge to get into the kitchen and do something.

This is what I came up with… considering I already had some “Christmas” fruit mix in the fridge.

Just in time too, for New Year’s Day lunch, when my mom and 2 brothers came over for a meal.

As usual, I chose a no-knead bread… and of course, from my favorite book – The New Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day.

The recipe can be found here.  (I halved the recipe.)