Abalone and Scallop Nest

For special occasions, I break out the special stuff.

The occasion I’m talking about this time was hubby’s birthday… not a special numbered birthday, but for me any birthday of his a special day!

For this dish, because the ingredients are stars by themselves, no special recipe is required.  What is crucial, however, is a good (and I do mean a REALLY GOOD) can of abalone!  Of course, fresh scallops and properly prepared bamboo shoots are important too, but these 2 ingredients can be substituted with any other seafood and vegetable.  The abalone (and its sauce) is the true star of the dish.

Drain and reserve the sauce from the canned abalone.  Sauté the bamboo shoots (cleaned, sliced, boiled and drained).  Pour in a little of the abalone sauce.  Stir-fry until the shoots and coated.  Using a slotted spoon, transfer the bamboo shoots to a serving dish.

In the same pan, sauté the scallops with a little more of the abalone sauce until the scallops are almost done.  Again with a slotted spoon, transfer the scallops to the serving dish, mounding the scallops in the middle of the dish.

In the same pan, pour in all of the abalone sauce and heat until it boils gently.  Add the abalone and heat through (do not over-do it or the scallops will become tough).  Using a pair of tongs, transfer the abalone to the serving plate, arranging them decoratively in a circle.

Pour the heated abalone sauce all over the dish and splash with a few drops of black sesame oil.

Enjoy while it is hot!

 

Chili Tahong Scrambled Eggs

Leftovers are inevitable.  Most of the time we just eat it the next meal. Once in a while though, a remake is a good idea!  The easiest, and fastest, by far is an omelette (or scrambled eggs).  Besides, it is hubby’s favorite for breakfast!

Tahong Omelette 2

The recipe –

2 eggs
2 tablespoons mussel broth
salt and pepper, to taste
chili flakes and/chili oil
12 to 18 pieces of mussel meat

Mix together eggs and broth (or plain water) until combined.  Season with salt and pepper, as preferred.

Heat oil in a small, non-stick pan.  Sauté the chili flakes (or oil) the pour in the egg mixture.  Push cooked edges of the egg into the center, letting the uncooked center slide out to the sides.  Keep pushing the cooked portions into the center until almost cooked (still wet though).

Add the mussel meat and swirl lightly.  Serve immediately.

 

 

Halabos na Tahong

To be honest, I am not fully certain what halabos is as a cooking technique.  But what I’ve been taught by our kusinera (home cook) a good 25 to 30 years ago is that it is a “cross” between steaming and boiling.  How is this so?  Well, a very small amount of water or stock is used to cook the dish (usually seafood, especially shrimps).  The dish would be cooked largely by the steam generated by the water or stock.  (I hope that made sense because I don’t really know how to explain it…)

But to demonstrate it, here is halabos na tahong (mussels).

The recipe –

1 kilo tahong (mussels)
4 to 5 thin slices of ginger
4 cloves of garlic, smashed
1 small onion, sliced
1 medium tomato, sliced thinly
1 to 2 cups water
salt to taste
1 to 2 pieces finger chili
handful of dahon ng sili (pepper leaves)

Wash the tahong well and remove any dirt and “hair”.  Drain.

Sauté the ginger, garlic and onions.  Add the tomatoes.  Stir fry a couple of minutes then add in the mussels.  Pour in the water and cover the pan.  When the water starts to boil, throw in the finger chili and sili leaves.  Season with salt, to taste.  Stir occasionally.  When the mussels open, turn off the flame.  Do not over-cook.  If the water fully evaporates, add hot water in half cup increments.

The broth (what little of it is left, that is) is very tasty and I always exercise (what I call) cook’s privilege which means no one else gets the broth but me!  (hwa-hwa-hwa.)

*I like using a wok for this dish.  I find it easier to stir the mussels around so that they cook evenly.